Jason Woodcock

With a background in conservation and animal behaviour studies, Jason's passion lies in the natural world. He adores all things nature and enjoys nothing more than spotting rare and interesting species out in the wild. He has also worked in a zoo and knows plenty about keeping the animals inside our homes healthy and happy, too.

British Wildlife of the Week: Black Rat

What is the rarest mammal in Britain? The pine marten, perhaps? The red squirrel? Water vole? Well, a 2018 study led by The Mammal Society, which determined that one in five British mammals face a high risk of extinction here, identified three species as the most endangered. One was the Scottish wildcat, which we’ve already covered on this blog; the rather vague estimate of between 30 and 430 pure, or almost pure, wildcats still live in the remote corners of the Scottish Highlands.

British Wildlife of the Week: Mole

With an estimated population of over 40 million, the European mole is one of the most common mammals in the British Isles. Yet it is one that we hardly, if ever, see. The only clues that might give away its presence are the odd clumps of soil that we call molehills. Of course, it’s hardly surprising that the mole is so elusive because it spends virtually the whole of its short but active life underground, safely hidden from predators above.

Five Fantastically Freaky Frogs

Welcome back to The Nature Nook for our first post of 2021! We hope everyone has had a great Christmas and New Year and is ready to delve into our next Freaky Frog article! So far in this series, we’ve looked at a frog the size of a baked bean, a frog whose unsightly folds of wrinkled skin has earned it the name ‘scrotum frog’, a frog that can protrude its own bones from its toepads, and a frog that freezes solid and defrosts with the changing of the seasons. All very strange adaptations, I’m sure you’ll agree.

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